60-Second Civics

Tuesday, January 25
   Daily civics quiz
Who wrote the poem Concord Hymn, which features the famous line ,"the shot heard 'round the world?"

 
 
 
 

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About the Podcast: 60-Second Civics is a daily podcast that provides a quick and convenient way for listeners to learn about our nation’s government, the Constitution, and our history. The podcast explores themes related to civics and government, the constitutional issues behind the headlines, and the people and ideas that formed our nation’s history and government.

60-Second Civics is produced by the Center for Civic Education. The show's content is primarily derived from the Center’s education for democracy curricula, including We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution, Foundations of Democracy, and Elements of Democracy.

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Get Involved: Join the conversation about each episode on Twitter. Or you can contact the show by emailing Mark Gage. Let me know what you think!

You Can Help: 60-Second Civics is supported by private donations. You can help keep the podcasts coming by donating, buying an ebook, or by writing a nice review in iTunes to help others discover the show. We love our listeners. You are the reason we created the podcast. Thank you for your kind support!

Music:
The theme music for 60-Second Civics is provided by Cheryl B. Engelhardt. You can find her online at cbemusic.com. The song featured on the podcast is Cheryl B. Engelhardt's "Complacent," which you purchase on iTunes, along with all of Cheryl's music.


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60-Second Civics: Episode 4527, Concord Hymn: The Road to Independence, Part 15
"The shot heard 'round the world" is a line in the poem Concord Hymn describing the effect of the outbreak of the American Revolution in April 1775. Learn more in today's podcast!

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4526, Lexington and Concord: The Road to Independence, Part 14
By 1774 many of the more radical colonists were beginning to prepare for war against Great Britain.  These colonists formed civilian militias. On April 19, 1775, some 700 British troops tried to march to Concord, Massachusetts. Listen for more!

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4525, First Continental Congress: The Road to Independence, Part 13
Colonists formed committees of correspondence to publicize colonial opposition and coordinate resistance. In 1774 colonies sent representatives to Philadelphia to discuss potential responses to the British government. The meeting was called the First Continental Congress. 

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4524, The Intolerable Acts: The Road to Independence, Part 12
Following the Boston Tea Party, the British government responded with what colonists called the Intolerable Acts, a series of Punitive Acts that, among other things, closed Boston Harbor to all trade.Listen to today?s episode to learn more!

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4523, John Adams and the Boston Massacre: The Road to Independence, Part 10
Controversial at the time, lawyer and later president John Adams defended the British soldiers and their captain following the Boston Massacre. Learn more about his motivation for doing this in today's episode!

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4522, The Boston Massacre: The Road to Independence, Part 9
On the night of March 5, 1770, a riot broke out and shots were fired in what would later be known as the ?Boston Massacre.? Learn more about this important event in today?s episode!

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4521, Daughters of Liberty: The Road to Independence, Part 8
After repealing the hated Stamp Act in 1766, the British Parliament passed the Declaratory Act, asserting Great Britain's full power and authority over the American colonies. In response a group of American women calling themselves the Daughters of Liberty led boycotts of English goods. Listen for more!

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4519, The Stamp Act Congress: The Road to Independence, Part 7
The Stamp Act Congress was held in October 1765 in New York to coordinate colonial resistance to the unpopular Stamp Act, which required nearly every important document printed in the colonies to be taxed. Hear more about this significant occurrence in today's episode!

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4518, The Sons of Liberty: The Road to Independence, Part 6
Opposition to the Stamp Act prompted American colonists to organize. The Sons of Liberty was one group created to resist the Stamp Act inspired by the words of Isaac Barre. Learn more about this group in today's episode!

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60-Second Civics: Episode 4515, The Sugar Act: The Road to Independence, Part 3
The American colonists were already unhappy with the British about the Proclamation of 1763. But then they took another step that angered Americans. In 1764, Parliament passed the Sugar Act. Learn more in today's episode!

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