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U.S. Representative Earl Blumenauer spoke May 3, 2011, about the We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution National Finals on the floor of the House of Representatives. Here is what he had to say:

Mr. Speaker, it was my great privilege to spend a major portion of the weekend watching young constitutional scholars from Portland's Grant High School compete in the national Constitution competition here in our Nation's Capital.

It was an amazing experience watching these young men and women debating the fine points of our Constitution. While I had a personal interest with one of the students there, it became clear, watching the competition, that everybody was a winner.

As I was watching the finals, where they were one of the top 10 teams in the Nation, it was fascinating to contemplate what was going on in the much broader context in terms of what this represented. Everybody was a winner—the student constitutional scholars, their dedicated coaches and teachers. Most important, America was winning.

They were part of tens of thousands of students across the country who dove into the intricacies of the Constitution over the past year. They delved into its antecedents like the Magna Carta and the Articles of Confederation. They deal with the Civil War and the challenges to our constitutional ideals and the practicality of governance in a time of war. They pondered the struggle to give all Americans the promises embedded in the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence. They explored the conflict between the rule of law and its too often flawed implementation. Continue reading

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Jack Pugh of Wyoming wrote a series of articles in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle about the impact of the We the People program in his state. Read his inspiring words here: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

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We the People is a bright light in the darkness.

—Justice William Hill, Wyoming Supreme Court

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"We the People changed my life. It's as simple as that. Any and all academic, personal, or professional success I've enjoyed can, in some way, be traced to my participation in We the People as a high school student 16 years ago.

We the People taught me the history of our country and our Constitution. It taught me how our government works—and how it might work better. We the People taught me constitutional law and political philosophy. Even more importantly, it taught me how to learn. How to think. How to work on a team. How to be a friend. How to speak in public. How to listen. How to write. How to take constructive criticism. How to give it. How to believe in myself. How to rely on others. How to compete with dignity. How to…you name it.

We the People taught me more than any other class I've taken—in high school, college, and law school. We the People taught me that our government serves—and responds to—the People. We the People taught me that writing Congress isn't a futile gesture. We the People taught me that citizens—of all ages, from anywhere—can shape national policy. We the People taught me to believe in this country."

—Benjamin Glickman


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“This will be my thirtieth year teaching high school American government. For the last six years my students have participated in the We The People program sponsored by the Center for Civic Education. Nothing I have ever done, no curriculum I have used, and no program of motivation that I have tried has been as effective in as many aspects of civic education as the We The People program.”

—Alvin Bell


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"It's not just about 'knowledge,' it's about providing students with the skills and the attitude that THEY are the 'people' in 'WE THE PEOPLE!' "

—Jim Bentley